All Articles For Stewart, Angus

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What are the ingredients for a great holiday or a blessed vacation? This summer’s British Re­formed Fellowship (BRF) Family Conference in Scot­land has them all (Saturday, 26 July-Saturday, 2 August, 2014)! Great Venue Most people, undoubtedly, reckon that the venue is important. Gartmore House, a magnificent eighteenth-century mansion, surely fits the bill. Situated in 75 acres of private land with some lovely walks, Gartmore pos­sesses its own sports facility, ideal for badminton, soccer, etc., for younger or more athletic people, and enjoys views stretching 25 miles to Stirling Castle and the Wallace Monument, commemorating a thirteenth-century Scot­tish hero. All the...

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The Christian’s calling to engage in holy war against the lie and his enjoyment of the blessing of spiri­tual peace can both be helpfully summarized in the Heidelberg Catechism’s teaching on the five solas of the Reformation (sola is Latin for alone or only). Salvation is by faith alone in Christ alone through grace alone to the glory of God alone according to Scripture alone. The solas exclude and so fight against all that “adds” to the truth of the gospel, for, in reality, any addition takes away from it and so denies it. The solas give us peace because...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. The Web site of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church (CPRC) in Northern Ireland is our most cost-effective and international form of witnessing. It bears its testimony day unto day and night unto night, for the Internet never sleeps. Whereas it is too much to claim that “There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard” (Ps. 19:3), we do at least have items in over a hundred foreign languages (especially Italian, Portuguese, German, Russian, Spanish, Afrikaans, Dutch, French, Filipino, and Ukrainian). Many are the...

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This is a continuation of Rev. Stewart’s article in the Special Reformation Issue, October 15, 2010, p. 42. The Westminster Confession on the Church In keeping with the directives of the Solemn League and Covenant (1643), the Westminster divines fervently sought a thoroughly biblical and doctrinal church unity for the Reformed churches of the British Isles. The Westminster Confession’s opening chapter, “Of the Holy Scripture,” is, in my opinion, the greatest creedal statement anywhere on the truth of God’s inspired Word. Philip Schaff states, “No other Protestant symbol has such a clear, judicious, concise, and exhaustive statement of this fundamental...

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The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church, Volume 7: Our Own Time, by Hughes Oliphant Old. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2010. Pp. Xx + 714. Paper. ISBN 978-0-8028-1771-6. [Reviewed by Angus Stewart.] Seven Monumental Volumes “A work of supererogation”—that is how one minister describes reading all seven volumes of Hughes Oliphant Old’s The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church(1998-2010). I couldn’t disagree more! Having read every page of all seven volumes and having eagerly waited for them to come off the press, I can say that I have...

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Theme and Speeches “Ye shall be witnesses unto me,” declared the risen Lord to His eleven disciples, just moments before He ascended into heaven. According to Christ’s command, prophecy, and promise, His gospel, church, and kingdom have spread from Jerusalem to Judaea to Samaria and “unto the uttermost part of the earth” (Acts 1:8). Today, the Christian church is “more global” than ever before, but the church’s official work in its missionary labors and the believer’s personal witness are as necessary as they have ever been. But what must we say as Christ’s witnesses? How must we witness? Where and...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: May 1, 2009, p. 352. Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions (1965) Given the Roman Church’s false ecumenism with the Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, and Protestants, it is no surprise that it is engaged in syncretism with pagan religions.1 After all, Jehoshaphat’s false ecumenism with the apostate Northern Kingdom (II Chron. 18; 20:31-37) led him into syncretism with pagan Edom (II Kings 3). Rome has always been syncretistic to some degree. Witness its compromises in the conversion of the...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. The Web site of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church (CPRC) in Northern Ireland is our most cost-effective and international form of witnessing. It bears its testimony day unto day and night unto night, for the Internet never sleeps. Whereas it is too much to claim that “There is no speech nor language, where their voice is not heard” (Ps. 19:3), we do at least have items in over a hundred foreign languages (especially Italian, Portuguese, German, Russian, Spanish, Afrikaans, Dutch, French, Filipino, and Ukrainian). Many are the...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: January 15, 2009, p. 179. Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism (1964) is the Roman Catholic Church’s blueprint for restoring all professing Christians—especially the Eastern Orthodox, Anglicans, and Protestants—to the papal fold. This will also serve Rome’s geopolitical goals: one world, one religion, one pope. Early Protestant Ecumenism and the Edinburgh Missionary Conference The ecumenical movement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries involved Protestants with various backgrounds (Presbyterian, Congregationalist, Baptist, Anglican, Methodist, Reformed, Lutheran, etc.) who were typically either Arminian or modernist (or...

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Rev. Stewart is pastor of the Covenant Protestant Reformed Church in Northern Ireland. Previous article in this series: February 1, 2009, p. 206. Having considered Rome’s false ecumenism with Eastern Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, and Protestantism, as well as the principles of Roman ecumenism, it remains to examine the methods of its ecumenism. For this, the prime source is, once again, the Decree of Ecumenism (1964), produced by Rome’s last “ecumenical” council, Vatican II (1962-1965).1 Some examples shall also be given of the use of these methods (or weapons) in the slaughter of careless, apostatizing Protestants. Remember too that Rome’s labors to bring all...

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