All Articles For Ophoff, George

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Before turning to our subject, we must first take notice of the order of instructions which God gave to Moses for the establishing of the Israelitish commonwealth in Canaan. Numbers 33:52-56 contains the directions for the purifying of the holy land from all heathen defilement. The inhabitants of the land are to be driven out, all their pictures and molten images destroyed, and their high places plucked down. Next in order are the instructions for the division of the land among the people of Jehovah. It shall be done in a just and equitable manner. (33:54). The lawgiver now passes...

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To bring out this significance regard must be had to the character of this book. The character of the book has been variously defined. It has been described as an attempt “to furnish a new law which might be conducive to the interests of altered circumstances,” by another as, hortatory description, explanation and enforcement of the most essential contents of the covenant relations and covenant laws with emphatic prominence given to the spiritual principle of the law and its fulfillment. Lange comments on the purpose of the book as follows: “Deuteronomy. . . . the second law. But Deuteronomy is...

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The mediatorship was an office in the church instituted by God. lit was an office to which belonged the following duties: reconciling the people of Israel to God through a sacrifice by blood; praying for this people on the grounds of the merits of this sacrifice; blessing this people in God’s name and thus bringing the virtue of the sacrifice in living connection with them; speaking to this people God’s word and bringing them under its yoke. He who served this office was thus mediator of God and man. All the aforesaid duties formed his mediation. By virtue of his...

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As we have seen, the first three centuries of our Christian era formed a period of intermittent persecutions for the Christians. As Christ had predicted, all men—men of every class of society and every station of life—hailed and harassed God’s people. For, as was pointed out, in the eyes of men the followers of Christ formed a strange and dangerous community. They chose to live outside the pale of the religion of Rome. They refused to worship as God the emperor and his stature and to take part in any idolatrous ceremonies at public festivals. Their religion—the worship of the...

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On the same day, doubtless, that Joshua received command to cross the Jordan, he sent out the spies to go over Jericho about twenty miles distant, As mention is made of their being young men (Jos. 3:23), they perhaps were taken on account of their youthful vigor and courage. Having been a spy himself, Jos­hua knew from his own experience that the venture called for courage. Sending these youths into Jericho was like sending them into a den of lions and expect­ing them to return. For the inhabitants of Canaan were desperate. They knew that an invasion of their country...

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Moses’ successor was Joshua. Let us get before us the early career of this man of God—that part of his career that endeth with the death of Moses. In the first book of the Chronicles (1 Chron. 7:20-27) Joshua’s pedigree reaches back through eight genera­tions and over a period of four hundred years to Eph­raim. He thus had Joseph as his ancestor; and of the two sons of Joseph he was sprung from the one who, though the younger, would be the greater. He was a scion of the chief family of the tribe, as his grand­father, Elishama (1 Chron....

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According to the Reformed conception, which is the only scriptural one, the deacons, elders, and ministers of the gospel, are, as office-bearers, of equal rank; and the presbytery or college of elders (consistory) is under Christ the only and highest judicial (not merely ethical) power in the church, which is the local congregation. According to Rome on the other hand, the church is the sum and total of local congregations; and in this community the bishop of Rome—the pope—is, under God the supreme judicial power and the culminating point; and to his person all the other dignitaries and powers in...

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Having narrated the passage through the Jordan, the sacred writer brings before us in succession (a) the effect of the invasion upon the heathen, ver. 1 of ch. 5; (b) the circumcision of the people, ver. 2-9 (c) the enjoyment of the bread of the land and the Passover in connection with the cessation of the manna, ver. 10-19; the appearance of the angel of God to Joshua, ver. 13-15; and finally the capture of Jericho, ch. 6. We briefly comment on the first four of these events to concentrate in the writing upon the capture of Jericho. The terror...

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First the question: What, in general, is culture. The term culture comes from a word that means to till, cultivate, promote the growth of an organism. In explaining the idea of culture, we may begin with plant culture. Here culture is the labor, the care, that the farmer bestows on the plants that he grows in his fields. He prepares the soil, sows the seed. He thereupon cultivates the plants. He keeps the soil loose, destroys the weeds that spring up around the plants. He feeds the plants through enriching the soil. This is done largely before the sowing of...

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Jericho has been captured. Its walls fell by faith. The victory was solely God’s and His gracious gift to His people in response to their faith—a faith of which their compassing the walls of the city was the living expression. Thus the victory was not of them, of anything they had done, for they had done nothing at all except march, shout, and blow the trumpets. Certainly the falling of the walls could not be attributed to their marching. The victory was the Lord’s; andthough in the warfare that was to follow, the people would take an active part—they must...

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