...

All Articles For Ophoff, George

Results 1 to 10 of 473

In my previous article I presented what may be collected from the scripture on the above-cited subject—arranging my remarks under the following divisions: 1. The description of the structure of these creatures. 2. The names applied to them. 3. The position assigned to them. 4. Their function. The first three of these divisions have been adequately dealt with. Thus we now pass on to division 4. The function or agency of the cherubim is set forth in the following statement: As the constant attendants of Jehovah, their task is to champion, vindicate and guard His holiness. Hence, when the Lord...

Continue reading

The explanation of the sin offering has been brought to completion. The offering next in order and the one to which attention is now to be directed is the trespass offering. In the original the name found for this offering is the word asham, the primary meaning of which is guilt. In its nature and design it was nearly identical to the sin offering, as is evident from the description of it given in Lev. 5:14; 6:7 and especially from the statement in chap. 7:7, “As the sin offering is, so is the trespass offering: there is one law for...

Continue reading

It is one of the remarkable peculiarities of the religion of Israel, that, while it claimed superiority over every other, and was distinguished from them all, as alone inculcating the worship of the only living and true God, and while it was perfectly suited to the purpose for which it was designed, it acknowledged that it was itself only preparatory to the future, a better, and a perfect revelation. It was professedly adopted and limited to one peculiar people;—it was confined, in many of its institutions, to the land of Judea; and being full of promises of better things to...

Continue reading

God is a self-conscious, intelligent, voluntary Spirit, possessing and this without limitation and to an infinite degree all perfections. He therefore can and also does reveal Himself. This revelation is twofold: general and special. The former is that conscious and voluntary act of God whereby He makes Himself known to all men as their creator through the medium of creation and providence, in order that men may glorify Him and, failing in this, be without excuse. The latter is that conscious and voluntary act of God whereby He makes Himself known unto His people as their redeemer-God in Christ Jesus...

Continue reading

With Luther’s ideas in circulation throughout the empire and also rapidly taking root in the hearts of men—the mass of humans that, formed western Christendom—the edifice of the pope, with all that pertained thereto, was tottering on its foundation and seemed already doomed to extinction. The people’s attachment to the Romish superstitions was fast diminishing; and at the same time Luther’s reputation increased day by day. The people in great numbers turned to him as the defender of truth and liberty. The dominion of the priest and monks was being shaken by his word, for the influence of this word...

Continue reading

(continued from last week) The significance of dreams. Dreams do have significance. They bespeak the state of the soul and the trend of its thought during waking hours. Now if the trend of thought of a man during his waking hours is in the way of the Lord’s commands, then the trend of his thought will be in this way when he is asleep and in his dreams, too, he will have fellowship with God. On the other hand, if, during the waking hours a man’s thinking and willing are under the dominion of the law of sin, his dream-life...

Continue reading

Having delivered the people of Israel from their Egyptian bondage, the Lord led them into a region of deserts, waterless tablelands, barren mountain chains and valleys where streams ran dry—the Sinai Peninsula. By bringing them into this trackless wilderness, the Lord took from them every natural resource and in particular bread—such bread as is the product of man’s own industry. It thus seemed as though they were doomed to perish from hunger. The carnal Israel so judged. They said, “Would to God we had died by the hand of the Lord in the land of Egypt, when we sat by...

Continue reading

The expression “fullness of time” occurs in scripture and is found at Gal. 4:4. The passage reads, “But when the fullness of time was come, God sent forth his Son . . .” The surroundings of this text show that the fullness of time is the time appointed by God, which v as to elapse until the appearing of Christ. It is of this time that the apostle speaks in the preceding three verses, the time of the state of minority of the church. This period is conceived as a measure that had to be filled ere the Son of...

Continue reading

The desert period of Israel’s national existence has ended. The command has been given that the journey to the promised land be resumed. Beginning at mount Hor, the way led by the Red Sea, and encompassed the land of Edom. The journey was difficult and the people became impatient and disgusted because of the way. They rebelled against the guidance of God and the leading of Moses. They said, “Wherefore have ye brought us up out, of Egypt to die in the wilderness? For there is no bread, neither is there any water; and our soul loatheth this despicable bread,”...

Continue reading

In public mourning of Aaron, the people of Israel now for thirty days have been encamped under the shadow of Mount Hor, when the command comes to them to press onward to Canaan. It means that the desert period of Israel’s national existence has ended. Moving southwards round the mountains of Edom at the head of the Elanitic Gulf of the Red Sea, they turned northwards, marching to Moab, by the way of the great eastern desert. The first part of their journey was most trying and difficult. It took them through a region that was pre-eminently “that great and...

Continue reading