All Articles For Lubbers, George C

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A brief explanation of the subject may be of benefit to the reader for the correct understanding of the issue involved. “Cur Deus Homo” is the title of a theological treatise from the pen of (St.) Anselm of Canterbury. He is considered one of the most eminent of the English prelates, and the father of medieval scholasticism. He was born in Italy in the year 1033 and he died April 21, 1109 at Canterbury, England. He thus attained the age of 76 years. The above-mentioned work of Anselm was begun by him in England. He writes in the “preface” on...

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What minister has in his congregational work not had to deal with the question of the certainty of faith! He not only has had to treat this question in his public discourses on the pulpit, but also has met with it in his personal contact with the flock as a shepherd. He meets with it in sick visitation as well as in the annual family visitation. This subject may therefore well be considered to be of vital importance in the life of God’s children. It touches the very heart-strings of Christian experience. It is up-to-date, actual, timely. With a great...

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In our former essay on this subject (See April 1 issue) we attempted to define the terms in our subject. In so doing we noticed the following: In the first place, that “Old Testament” is not to be identified or confused with O.T. Scriptures. For “Testament” in our subject means covenant and refers to the relationship established between God and His people, while the “Scriptures” are the infallible record of this covenant. Secondly, we observed, that “Testament” and “Dispensation” are also not identical. “Dispensation” in Holy Writ is the all-wise government and control of God the Father over all things...

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The Stone-lectures of Dr. A. Kuyper on Calvinism are well known in Reformed circles; it may be taken for granted that at least the title of this work is known by many of the readers. For the sake of those who may be interested in this subject and who are acquainted with this work a few remarks of an introductory nature will not be superfluous. Dr. Kuyper delivered these Stone-lectures in the month of October, 1898 at Princeton, N. J. They were delivered in the English language. However, they are also obtainable now in the Holland language. The question might...

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In our former article we quoted rather at length from Kuyper’s Stone-lectures. We may therefore assume in this article that there remains no doubt in the mind of the reader as to what his conception really was; what he deemed to be a Calvinistic interpretation of the history of mankind—mankind as such apart from the work of the Wonder of Grace in Christ Jesus. The conception developed in these lectures and the conclusions arrived at as it touches Calvinism is both negative and positive. Negative, in that it is asserted, that Calvinism is not to be understood in an exclusively...

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His Dualistic-Synthetic Conception of History To attempt a comprehensive criticism of Kuyper’s Stone-Lectures, with some regard to details in an article of five typewritten pages would be preposterous. These lectures cover every subject in the encyclopedia, of human knowledge. And what is more the author’s conception of Christian Encyclopedia is presupposed throughout. To understand these lectures one must bear in mind that they were written in maturer years of Kuyper’s life and that they give in abbreviated form his entire Life-and-World-View. Should we voice our objections against the various elements with which we take issue in these lectures, without attempting...

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Whereas the Passion Trilogy of Dr. Schilder has had and still enjoys wide publicity, we need not dwell at length to acquaint the readers with its nature and content. A few remarks will suffice. In it the author considers and contemplates the suffering of Christ’s death in its threefold stages. Volume I treats of Christ’s entering into His suffering and brings the discussion up to Christ’s being taken captive in Gethsemane; in Volume II the author considers Christ’s passing through His suffering. This volume brings the discussion up to His being condemned by Pilate to be crucified; and, finally, Volume...

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The title of this article is taken form the parable, that is most commonly known, as the parable of the unjust steward. To be exact it is found in Luke 16:9. There are some passages in Holy Writ which are difficult to interpret. For instance, such a passage as Galatians 3:20 is purported to have around four hundred interpretations. The parable recorded in Luke 16:1-13 is also considered very difficult to interpret. It is in verse 9, in the very passage in which Jesus applies the parable to the life of the church, that the difficulty arises. The passage reads...

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The title of this article is taken form the parable, that is most commonly known, as the parable of the unjust steward. To be exact it is found in Luke 16:9. There are some passages in Holy Writ which are difficult to interpret. For instance, such a passage as Galatians 3:20 is purported to have around four hundred interpretations. The parable recorded in Luke 16:1-13 is also considered very difficult to interpret. It is in verse 9, in the very passage in which Jesus applies the parable to the life of the church, that the difficulty arises. The passage reads...

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