All Articles For Laning, Margaret

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Are you having any difficulty communicating with your teenager? Do you hear a lot of truncated, unclear sentences? Maybe you tried hearing aids only to find they do not solve your problem. Well, look no further! “Mumble Unjumble” is here to help! This cuttingedge translator app will make the most muffled mumbling discernible. Consider this for example: “Canhamburgerout?” Within seconds your translation reads, “Can I hang out?” Or, “Nuttneats” quickly deciphers, “There’s nothing to eat.” “Candybarcar?” instantly appears, “Can I borrow the car?” Gone will be the days when you say, “I can’t hear you.” Or, “What did you say?”...

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“We lift up our child in prayer, Lord. Help us, for we  do not know what to do. Our child is walking in sin,  will not meet to talk with us about it, and is listening to  and giving in to spiritual enemies. We cry out for Thy  mercy. Thou alone hast power to change the heart….” Such is a prayer of Christian parents who have a wayward  child. Who else can set such a one free? “Bring  thy son hither…. And Jesus rebuked the unclean spirit,  and healed the child, and delivered him again to his father”  (Luke 9:41-42)....

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Dalton is my friend, though he never talks to me. Perhaps I should qualify that statement. Once in a while he says, “Skid loader.” Usually he holds up his necktie and gives me a big smile. He might like ties as much as skid loaders. Even so, they make great conversation openers. Hard to miss, built like a linebacker with boundless enthusiasm to connect with others, he has landed a soft spot with everyone at church. Dalton is special, but that is not what makes him really special. Dalton is blessed to have been raised by his loving Christian parents...

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Long before John Deere or Case International Harvester, there was a tribulum. A tribulum was an ancient, wooden threshing board studded with sharp flint. On the threshing floor the tribulum was dragged around and around over the harvested grain. With repeated strikes and beatings the kernel and chaff would separate, leaving the precious grain ready to gather and store. Related to the word “tribulum” is the Latin verb tribulare, meaning “to oppress” or “afflict.” From these words we get our word “tribulation.” Jesus said, “In the world ye shall have tribulation…” (John 16:33). We think of oppression, affliction, beating, and...

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It does not take long for a new mother to notice her work is never done. There are so many needs. There are diapers to change, feeding and burping the baby, giving baths, cooking, cleaning, washing laundry, ironing, fixing things that break, running errands, potty training, wiping noses…whatever the need is, and then some, as more children are added to the family. Perhaps a young mother’s most shocking realization is that the bulk of her work is routine and unglamorous. How do you, dear Christian mother, like doing those unpaid, lowly, menial tasks to meet the needs of others? Though...

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“Let me hear thy voice; for sweet is thy voice.” Song of Solomon 2:14 There are many interpretations on the Song of Solomon, yet most would agree it contains lovely communication between a bridegroom and his bride. The two sing one another’s praise. They speak with love and respect. Their speech involves sharing personal thoughts, including inmost longings, in safety. There is mutual trust. This level of communication is a giving of oneself, a way of saying, “I want to know you and I want you to know me.” There are no substitutes for heart to heart talks in marriage....

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Psalm 16 is called, “A Michtam of David.” “The Lord is the portion of mine inheritance and of my cup: thou maintainest my lot. The lines are fallen unto me in pleasant places; yea, I have a goodly heritage” (Ps. 16:5, 6). Michtam means contemplation, and these words are worth contemplating often. This is a happy, hopeful contemplation, is it not? What an inheritance God has promised! Surely, our cup runneth over. We and our believing children are adopted by God and heirs of a staggering, unheard of, massive inheritance. Nothing is greater than our portion—the presence and blessing of...

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(The following paragraph is a modern lament I call, How. Traditional Hebrew laments, such as Lamentations, began their text using the word “How”—see Lamentations 1:1, 2:1, and Lamentations 4:1. Thus, the title of Lamentations is Ekah, “How.”) How did this marriage turn so cold when, once upon a time, it was beautiful and loving? The young Christian couple shared everything together and lived as one. The years passed and their relationship deteriorated to a mere outward performance of duties and responsibilities. Sometimes they verbally attacked one another. Usually, they did not talk at all. Each prided himself/herself that the other...

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It is a sweltering, humid day—a clarion call of the coming monsoon season. It will not be long before God opens the heavens with thunderous sheets of water, turning roads into rivers of muddy black and ocher. The electricity is sporadic—a reminder that reliable electricity is a luxury here. The odor of wet dog wafts in the heavy air as we sit in plastic patio chairs inside a long, narrow room. From young to old, most of the women wear traditional skirts, or tamein. Upon their faces pale yellow circles on each cheek, an ancient sunscreen called thanaka made of...

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How can one measure stress? Some use a numbering system called the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. Although any given event can affect individuals differently, some 43 events have been assigned stress points, to give a rough estimate for the general public. For example, death of spouse is at the top of the list with 100 stress points. For the child, it is death of a parent, with the same number of points. Divorce is 73 points for adults and 90 for children of divorced parents. A parent dismissed from work can add 47 points, while for the child of...

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