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All Articles For Langerak, William

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of the Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. It is easy to overlook the lowly stone. But Scripture does not. In it, stone represents spiritual realities as commonality (II Chron. 1:15), a fool’s wrath (Prov. 27:3), danger (Ps. 91:12), end of man (Job 28:3), and terrified, lifeless, natural, and inhumane hearts (Ex. 15:16; I Sam. 25:37; Ezek. 11:19; Job 41:24). But it is especially their permanence that is special in the kingdom. More interested in show than substance, the children of men make their kingdom from brick (Gen. 11:3). God builds with stone. The corner of His...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of the Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. We might be tempted to disparage them after the leafy mess they make each fall, but the tree is a wonder to behold. It is prominent in the history of salvation. They are among the first living things created (Gen. 1:11-12). Paradise the first featured two trees; eating from one sustained human life, and eating from the other took it (Gen. 2:9-17). The guilty in Eden tried to hide their shame with trees (Gen. 3:7-8). Christ redeemed mankind from a tree (I Pet. 2:24) and is...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of the Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The table is an outstanding picture of the rich life God’s people enjoy within the covenant. It is where the lord of the house feeds family and friends, and they share sweet communion. In the covenant home, “children [live] like olive plants round about thy table” (Ps. 128:3). The Old Covenant house of God prominently featured a pair of golden tables (Ex. 25:23ff.). In the New Covenant, the congregation gathers regularly to worship at the Lord’s table. Covenant life, Christ promises, is “that ye may eat...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of the Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The year 1400 was a bad time to be a Lollard. For many English people, the dawning of the new century renewed hope. But for the Lollards the situation looked ominous. Lollards were disciples of John Wycliffe. Using itinerant preachers armed with newly translated Bibles and teaching in the mother-tongue, they spread Wycliffe’s views throughout England, from fish-mongers and farmers in remote hamlets to noblemen and aristocrats in castles. For almost 20 years after his death, they were relatively unmolested by the Catholic Church and civil...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Up is not a very impressive word. But it need not be, to be important in the Christian faith. Our God, who delights in saving base things, has also given great significance to rather mundane words. Faith and idolatry are the difference between worshiping a god and worshipingthe God. Heresy or orthodoxy regarding the Christ is determined by a single Greek letter (iota). The truth of creation rests upon the word day. And up is more significant than we may realize. Together with its antithesis down, this humble word describes an entire plane of...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Simply amazing, grace is. More glorious than the sun (Ps. 36:9), but few can see it (John 9:39). Exceedingly precious, but free (Eph. 2:7;Rom. 5:15). A gift; you cannot buy it (Rom. 5:15;Acts 8:20). More valuable than gold, but unwanted until received (Prov. 22:1; John 4:10). If you work for grace, you cannot have it; but without grace, you cannot work (Rom. 11:6; II Cor. 9:8). Most abundant, yet uncommon (II Cor. 4:15; Ex. 33:19). Gentle, yet irresistible (Acts. 4:33). It makes the dead alive, the weak strong, the blind...

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The Lion of Judah is Jesus. But it might surprise us that the lion is also a metaphor for the devil and the ungodly. It is a metaphor with which people living in the Middle East during Bible times were very familiar, for they lived among those wild beasts. With his bare hands, Samson killed a lion that roared at him in the way, giving rise to the riddle, “Out of the eater came forth meat, and out of the strong came forth sweetness” ( Judg. 14). The young shepherd David slew a thieving lion who had snatched a lamb...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. A cup is rather mundane. At least four times per year we hear, “the cup of blessing which we bless . . . .” But we often forget about the cup itself because of the element inside. Cups are like that, mere common household utensils like forks and plates, in themselves insignificant, yet very important as means to collect, distribute, and receive something for personal consumption. Scripture mentions a number of cups. The first is in a dream, the royal cup that a butler held in his...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. How easy it is to forget we live in the wilderness! With solid homes, comfortable clothes, fine food, and every convenience readily available—beds queen size and king, cell phones and Internet, refrigerators and microwaves, RVs and SUVs, doctors and hospitals—the wilderness seems quite far away. But in the wilderness we live, and there we shall die. God did not create the world as such. The blame lies with Lucifer, who, beginning with Eden, transforms all he touches—from lush lands to golden cities—into wilderness (Is. 14:17). Spiritually, it...

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Rev. Langerak is pastor of Southeast Protestant Reformed Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan. With the sound of a rushing mighty wind from heaven, they were all filled with the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:2-3). Fitting that on Pentecost the ascended Jesus poured out His personal Spirit into the hearts of His people as a powerful wind. Wind is an agent God uses to accomplish His good pleasure. No human being can direct from where it comes or to where it goes—it blows where it listeth (John 3:8). But God creates the wind (Amos 4:13) and brings it forth from His treasuries...

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