All Articles For Kuiper, Douglas J

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Previous article in this series: January 1, 2014, p. 159. Having emphasized in previous articles that elders must be male, we turn now to examine the qualification of the office of elder that governs all others: his blamelessness. The Fundamental Qualification This qualification of blamelessness is first. It is first in order. In both Scripture passages in which the qualifications of the office of elder are listed, “blame­less” begins the list. I Timothy 3:2 reads: “A bishop then must be blameless…”; and Titus 1:6 says, “If any be blame­less….” It is first in order, because it is first in priority....

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The Heroic Boldness of Martin Luther, by Steven J. Lawson. Orlando, FL: Reformation Trust Publishing, 2013. Pp xxii + 145. $16.00. Hardcover. [Reviewed by Douglas J. Kuiper.] This book is the latest in the series of short books under the series “A Long Line of Godly Men Pro­file.” So far in the series, Steven Lawson has written The Expository Genius of John Calvin, The Unwavering Resolve of Jonathan Edwards, and The Gospel Focus of Charles Spurgeon. In addition, Douglas Bond wrote The Mighty Weakness of John Knox. While I have read only the books on Calvin, and now Luther, I...

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Previous article in this series: September 15, 2013, p. 487. The position that we defend in this article is that men only, and not women, may be elders in Christ’s church. To be more clear, we do not hold that any man may be an elder. The qualifications set forth in I Timothy 3 and Titus 1 restrict the office to certain gifted and spiritually qualified men. But they also prohibit women from holding the office. Having given three reasons in our last article why we must vigilantly defend this position, let us now see that this position is not...

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Classis West held its fall meeting in Loveland, CO on October 9. The meeting date had been postponed from the usual September date, so that Classis could ex­amine Candidate Erik Guichelaar, who had accepted the call to be the pastor of the Randolph, WI PRC. Rev. Allen Brummel chaired the session. In addition to the thirty delegates from the churches in Classis West, Classis was attended by the synodical deputies from Classis East (Revs. Haak, Koole, and VanOverloop), and by Seminarian Joshua Engelsma, who is doing his internship in Peace PRC. Many members from Loveland PRC, as well as students...

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Previous article in this series: June 2013, p. 399. About twelve years ago, in this rubric, I defended the proposition that deacons must be men, that is, male in gender. In this and the following article, I defend the same point regarding the office of elder in the church of Jesus Christ: elders must be chosen from the male member­ship of the church. Not just any males may be elders: they must be adult, confessing believers who meet other requirements that God gives in I Timothy 3 and Titus 1. But they may not be females. Admittedly, this position is...

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Previous article in this series: March 15, 2013, p. 279. God tells His church what kind of men may, and what sort of men may not, hold the of­fice of elder. That He does this is reasonable. Because the office of elder is found in God’s church, God may dictate who holds the office. In addition, the office itself is God’s institution. And through the body of elders in a congregation, Christ Himself rules the congregation on God’s behalf. We do well, then, to pay close attention to the quali­fications of the office. First, by so doing we show that...

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Classis West met in regular session on March 6, 2013. The congregation in Lynden, WA hosted this meeting, as well as the officebearers’ conference the previous day—a commemoration of the 450th an­niversary of the Heidelberg Catechism. God reminds us that we must make all our plans subject to His will. One minister busied himself on Tuesday preparing a funeral speech; another minister and an elder had to return home early because of the death of the elder’s father; and another elder never ar­rived, his flight being cancelled due to winter weather. Rev. Spronk presided over the meeting. Classis ap­proved the...

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Previous article in this series: March 1, 2013, p. 153. God used the great Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century to restore the office of elder to its rightful place in the church of Christ—particularly in Reformed and Presbyterian churches. Having treated this restoration in our last article, we now conclude our treatment of the history of the office of elder by noting some highlights of this history after the time of the Reformation, and making a concluding analysis of this history. Creedal Expressions It belongs to the history of the office to note that the Reformed and Presbyterian confessions...

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Previous article in this series: January 1, 2013, p. 159.   We are currently examining the history of the office of elder after the time of the apostles in light of this question: how closely to God’s norm regarding the office of elder, which norm is given us in Scripture, did the church of Christ adhere after the time of the apostles? In our last article we saw that the office disappeared in the New Testament church after the first few centu­ries A.D. Now we see that God used the sixteenth cen­tury reformers, and particularly those who advocated what is...

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By the Vision of Another World: Worship in American History, ed. James D. Bratt. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans, 2012. 221 pages. Paper­back. $25.00. ISBN 978-0-8028-6710-0. Reviewed by Douglas J. Kuiper. The heart of this book consists of seven essays, each of which explores worship in a particular time in American history, and by a particular subculture. The first essay focuses on the worship of the Puritans in the 1500s and 1600s; the second on worship in American Methodism in the 1700s; the third on the worship of Our Lady of Guadalupe by the San Antonio Texans in the...

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