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All Articles For Heys, John A.

Results 61 to 70 of 660

In our last installment in this department we called your attention to the fact that the lips and tongue play an important part in the believer’s prophetic calling. It is about this matter that we would call your attention somewhat more fully at this time. For the believer as a prophet of God is by no means one who simply receives revelation from God. He is the seer who has been caused to see things by God, but he is also one who reacts to what he sees. He is one who speaks concerning what he sees and hears.

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When you return home from a brief vacation and you find your ornamental plants hanging their leaves in a way that tells you that the plant is in great need of reviving and refreshing water, your plants will respond in a short time after you have given them this important water. When you feed your pet cat, she will purr with contentment. Your pet dog will show his thankfulness by the wagging of his tail or by leaping all over you when you show him attention and give him food. And man. . . .?

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The human body is a wonderful piece of workmanship whose existence must be ascribed only to the all-wise and Almighty God. And the more a believer considers the members of that body in their amazing construction and astoundingly harmonious working together of the several parts the more he sees that wherefore he owes praise to his God. Man constructs some marvelous machines and mechanisms and receives praise and honor for it.

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“The wages of sin is death”, and less than death it cannot be. The extreme penalty must be inflicted by the righteous and sovereign Creator of all things and Lord of lords. For thereby He glorifies Himself. The sinner always refuses to serve God, and all sin is a failure to glorify Him who alone is worthy to receive praise and adoration and who made all things for His own glory. All sin is rebellion against this “jealous” God.

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When one compares the report of the special session of Classis East which was held in February with the report of the March session of Classis West, one is forced to conclude that unless there are sudden and complete reversals of opinion, the Declaration of Principles as drawn up by the 1950 Synod will be rejected by our churches. Classis West had almost unanimously decided to advise Synod not to adopt it. Classis East is very greatly divided in its stand over against this declaration. How can one conclude anything else than that to all appearances our churches do not...

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The Rev. De Roer writes in Concordia that he is afraid that at our next Synod the decision concerning the Declaration of Principles will hinge upon the question whether a president is chosen from the delegates of Classis West or from those of Classis East. He argues that seeing that the president cannot have a vote, and seeing that the delegates from each classis have their minds made up concerning the Declaration, and seeing that the president that is to be elected cannot vote on the Declaration, therefore it is possible that the Declaration will pass by a vote of...

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