All Articles For Harbach, Robert C.

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Modern liberal religion is a philosophy of ethics and morality. In fact, liberal interpretation makes ethics and morals of central importance in the shade of which stands religion, faith and practice. The biblical and theological religion of redemption is reduced to a social ethic, with Jesus Christ the paragon of ethicists. Not the saving power of God, but the spiritual competence of man is the important element in the modern gospel. It propagates a social gospel which concerns itself with the ethical problems of the present life. God and the world to come are matters of personal opinion.

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A philosopher is supposed to have said, “Let me write the songs of a people, and I care not who makes their laws.” Most of the songs of the people of today are inspired of the devil. With his songs so popular, what does he care about “their laws?” They are completely his captives. Suppose the above quotation had been made by Pete Seeger, folk singer, identified as a member of the Communist Party by the House Committee on Un-American Activities, Annual Report for the Year 1961, p. 43. We would in that event have no trouble getting his drift.

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The rationalistic school of biblical criticism claims that in and after the Protestant Reformation the development of biblical textual, literary and historical studies was not possible because of the doctrinal bias and intolerance of the Protestant theologians. Romanism also hampered advance in this direction with its canons of the Council of Trent (1546), which prohibited not only other shades of interpretation, but thought other than that already imposed by the church. So, both Romanism and Protestantism had contributed to intellectual stagnation.

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2. Its Method and Result (cont’d). The facts available in the study of Scripture manuscripts do not warrant more than one author of Genesis. Nor does single authorship necessarily demand one single style of writing throughout. One author treating different subjects may very well reveal different styles appropriate to his themes. A university professor preparing a manuscript of a philosophy text-book writes in a style different from his successful efforts it poetry. A preacher’s pulpit style may be generally rhetorical, but his colloquial style, humorously practical.

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Recently many of us read an editorial in a “Reformed” publication concerning the preaching of Billy Graham. The article surprised, even shocked many of us, since it slighted a man thoroughly Reformed and came to the defense of one whose true colors are anything but of a Reformed hue. The item referred to did what is so commonly done with this modern prophet in religious circles today, namely, it sugarcoated him as a Fundamentalist next to whom any good Reformed man could be proud to stand. But it is at least extremely inaccurate, if not, false, to portray Billy Graham...

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The Holy Scripture provides for a very clear and plain interpretation of itself. Difficulty, however, will arise if we do not observe that there are words and terms employed in Scripture which have variant shades of meaning. It may not therefore be insisted that each word in every instance of its occurrence has the same single meaning. Such a method of interpretation could easily produce false doctrine. Error would obtain, for example, if we invariably referred the word “flesh” to the physical body. Objectionable it would be also to translate the N.T.

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Once more Mr. L. W. of Spokane raises further questions and offers criticisms the esteemed editor and undersigned deem worthy of answer. But as Mr. W.’s letter is rather lengthy for the Question Box, brief excerpts will be taken from it with answer made as concisely as possible. It had been said (TSB, Mar. 15, 1967, P. 287), “the historic creeds and theological systems contain nothing of” Dispensationalism.

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What we have been maintaining, according to Scripture, is that God has but one people in all dispensations, and that therefore, O. and N.T. saints are identified by the same name. This is borne out in the following. “One shall say, ‘I am the Lord’s’; and another shall call himself by the name of Jacob, and another shall subscribe with his hand unto the Lord, and surname himself by the name of Israel.” (Isa.

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