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All Articles For Hanko, Cornelius

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The question whether God suffered in the sacrifice of His Son is as important as it is interesting. True it is, that a question of this kind leads us into the profound mysteries of God where we can only tread with fear and reverence, yet this need not deter us from listening to the testimony of Scripture on this subject. Whenever God speaks concerning Himself in His Self-revelation in the Scriptures, we do well to listen. We are interested just now in the question whether the sacrifice of the only begotten Son of God on the cross involved suffering for...

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At least on two separate occasions during His public ministry Jesus made the candid remark, “An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after a sign; and there shall no sign be given to it, but the sign of the prophet Jonas.” It bears the earmarks of a Mashal, that is, a proverb, or dark saying, frequently used in Scripture for the purpose of forcing itself upon the attention of the audience to set them to thinking, so that they cannot forget it and must ponder its significance, whether they will heed it or not. Many times Jesus made use of the...

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There are possibly no two other terms in the field of theology more commonly confused and misunderstood than the terms foreknowledge and fore-ordination, or the more familiar word, predestination. Both these terms have this in common that they are Scriptural terms, each referring to some definite phase of the eternal counsel of God’s will, in which divine election and reprobation take a prominent place. They are intimately related to each other as cause and effect, since God’s sovereign foreknowledge is the determining cause of His eternal predestination. Turning to the Scripture we meet various passages, particularly in the New Testament,...

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Freedom of the press is considered to be one of the inherent attributes of a democracy. While a dictatorship necessarily suppresses the press under its authority, allowing nothing to be published for public consumption than what can serve its interests, a democracy is supposed to give every individual free rein to express in print any views and opinions or divulge any information within the sphere of decency and good order. Thus freedom of the press, as a part of free speech, is one of the “four freedoms” we are said to be fighting for in this present war. It is...

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RESOLVED—that the Underground Movement in Occupied Countries is Revolutionary. Affirmative: Because of the timely nature of our subject, the terms used hardly need further elucidation. Ever since the outbreak of the war in Europe such terms as “the underground” and “the occupied countries” have been heard repeatedly on the radio, read in the papers and found on every lip. Who does not realize at once that by “occupied countries” is meant those countries in Europe which have been overrun by the German war-machine and have since been under Nazi control? The “underground” is also familiar to all as the subversive...

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The Rev. P. De Boer conducted the usual opening exercises. It appeared from the credentials that all the churches were represented. Rev. L. Doezema takes the chair as president of the day, and Rev. P. De Boer serves as secretary. The president extends a word of welcome particularly the two new ministers now serving in Classis West, Rev. C. Hanko and Rev. L .Vermeer, and also to the deputies ad examina, the Reverends B. Kok, A. Petter, and M. Schipper. The church visitors for the middle West present their report, informing the Classis that love and unity prevail in the...

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RESOLVED—that the Underground Movement in Occupied Countries is Revolutionary. AFFIRMATIVE REBUTTAL Allow me to state that it is a pleasure for me to debate this subject with so worthy an opponent as the Rev. H. Hoeksema. I appreciate the fact that he has a marked ability to clearly state the issue in question, which is particularly advantageous in this case where the whole argument is so definitely on the side of the affirmative. I also appreciate that he expresses agreement with my contention that we must be subject to those in authority, regardless of how they come into power, and...

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From all appearances there is a decided change in the attitude of the Soviet government toward religion, which, according to some reporters, promises to outlast the war. Ever since the rise of the Soviet Union repeated attempts have been made to suppress, if not to wipe out religion in Russia. The first assault was launched in 1917 when Communism came into power. Priests and bishops were jailed, exiled and executed by the thousands. The church schools and press were outlawed, while property was confiscated and turned into nurseries, granaries, anti-religious museums and the like. In 1928 other steps were taken...

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In times of local or national calamity the government steps in to aid the distressed. Whether a certain community is inundated by a flood, so that homes are destroyed and crops are ruined or whether the whole nation suffers from a depression, the government is called upon to send the necessary relief. She also serves by erecting institutions for the psychopaths, sanitariums for the disabled and hospitals for the sick. This is not only taken for granted, but commonly considered to be her duty. The government, it has often been said, owes us our living. And it is frequently regarded...

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Should anyone ask you whether Christ assumed our human nature as an individual, a fellow man among men, or whether He merely assumed a general human nature, you would most likely express your assent with the former and reject that latter. The question comes down to this, did the Son of God have His own, individual human nature, or did He have a nature that is common to the human race? In answer to that you would no doubt say that He had His own human nature as a distinct individual among us. You would bolster your position by showing...

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