All Articles For Hanko, Cornelius

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Dear Mr. Editor, May I express my appreciation to Mr. J. Gritter and the Rev. A. Petter for responding to my article which appeared in the S.B. some time ago, especially since a discussion of this kind can prove beneficial to those interested in a separate labor organization. But to avoid misunderstanding, I would also appreciate the privilege of answering some of the criticism that is offered. Mr. Gritter expresses surprise that the C. L. A. should be accused of not being as distinctive as a Christian labor organization should be, especially because they have always been told that their organization...

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In times like these the question presents itself quite readily whether the times are conducive toward continuing our mission endeavors or whether it might not be advisable to discontinue them, at least for the present. The more so because of the peculiar nature of our mission work. It is true that the war has practically closed every foreign mission field, and that therefore every available means could well be applied at home, but the fact is that as yet all our effort have been restricted to a home field. We have not yet reached a stage where we were able...

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Radio broadcasting is the latest, most up to-to-date form of mission work. It has this great advantage that it knocks at the door of hundreds, or even thousands of homes at the same time, and gains admittance whereever there is interest in religious programs, thereby reaching many that could hardly be reached in any other way. There is a wide variety of such programs on the air particularly on Sunday, so that a simple turn of the dial frequently carries the listener from a Jewish to a catholic, from a denominational to an undenominational broadcast of various faiths. One cannot...

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A strike has been defined as “the act of a body of workmen employed by the same master, in stopping work together at  a prearranged time, and refusing to continue until higher wages, or shorter time, or some other concession is granted them by the employer.” (Black’s Law Dictionary) This definition, which agrees in essence with various other definitions on the subject, can serve our purpose to establish what is to be understood by the strike as it is commonly known among us, in the sphere of labor and industry. It is necessary to make a distinction at the outset...

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The term Synoptic Gospels is used in reference to the first three Gospels of the New Testament in distinction from the Gospel according to John which is not included in this group. The word synoptic means literally to view together, from the Latin syn—together, and opsis—view, referring to the fact that the three evangelists, Matthew, Mark and Luke, view the earthly life and ministry of Jesus from a very similar aspect, as it were, from the same vantage point. Any attentive reader will soon note that there is marked difference between the Gospel written by John and the other three,...

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Esteemed Editor: May I once more obtain space in the Standard Bearer? In the April 15 issue of our paper Mr. Gritter, secretary of the C.L.A. complains that he is growing tired of constantly repeating that his organization wants no part of the strike such as used by unchristian organizations. But for that he has only himself to blame since he still fails to make plain that, even though there is a difference of degree, there is also an essential and principle difference between the stand of the C.L.A. and the worldly unions on the matter of strikes. Nor do...

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Esteemed Editor, In his article in the August issue of the Standard Bearer, Mr. Gritter still fails to show that there is an essential difference between the stand of the CLA and the worldly unions on the matter of the strike. No one denies that there is a difference of degree, since the CLA is quite conservative in condoning the strike, allowing such a strike only as a last extreme and with­out any accompanying acts of violence, such as de­struction of property, etc. Yet essentially they too maintain the strike. And to that I raised objections. The readers will recall...

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It has always been a safe and established rule to determine the author of a certain book of Holy Writ, if at all possible, from the book itself. What surer guide could we have than the Word of God, which is its own indubitable testimony of its infallibility? Applying this rule to the book of Ecclesiastes it hardly seems possible that any one should as much as question the fact that Solomon is its author. The first chapter expresses this very definitely. Its opening statement reads: “The words of the Preacher, the Son of David, king in Jerusalem.” Although he...

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The book of Proverbs, as the name expresses, is a collection of proverbs written by Solomon, who was especially endued with the Spirit of wisdom as the preacher-king of Israel. It is made up of three main parts plus two short appendices. The first section of the book includes the first nine chapters, and serves as an extensive introduction into the main theme of the book. Here Wisdom is presented as the one great good, which calls us away from the seductions of sin and urges us to enter her portals and feast on her bounties. (See, for example, Prov....

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*A talk given at the Chr. School Aux. meeting, Jan. 6, 1944. It is quite significant that a meeting of this nature can be planned and successfully carried out, especially in the times in which we are now living. It means that the present world-wide conflagration which has made such inroads into our thoughts and lives, has not destroyed your interest in your home problems, particularly in the education of your covenant youth. It also means that as a Protestant Reformed group you love and cherish your distinctive principles to the extent that you desire to apply them to every...

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