All Articles For Gritters, Barry

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Come and Welcome to Jesus Christ, by John Bunyan (1628-1688). Carlisle, PA: Banner of Truth Trust, 2004 (first published in 1681, and republished in Bunyan’s Works, Volume 1, Banner of Truth, 1991). 230 pp. (paper). $8.99. [Reviewed by Prof. Barrett Gritters.] The Calvinistic Puritan John Bunyan, best known for his Pilgrim’s Progress, wrote a fine exposition of John 6:37, which the Banner of Truth has recently republished in a small paperback. If the reader is hesitant to pick up a Puritan work because of expected tedium, he may find himself happily surprised at the sound exegesis, pointed applications, and non-tedious reading....

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Light for the City: Calvin’s Preaching, Source of Life and Liberty by Lester DeKoster. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2004. 139 pp. (paper). $20.00. [Reviewed by Prof. Barrett L. Gritters.] Calvin scholar Lester De Koster has produced a small work whose thesis, apparent in the title, comes out more clearly in his “Forewarning,” as he puts it. First he lets Calvin speak: “It certainly is the part of the Christian man to ascend higher than merely to seek and secure the salvation of his own soul.” Then De Koster, rhetorically: “Merely” the soul? Yes, so he said. And “higher”...

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Prof. Gritters is professor of Practical Theology in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. “Let your joy in God be stronger than your sadness in sin.” (Luther, on Philippians 4) “The highest and best part of a happy life consists in this, that God forgives a man’s guilt, and receives him graciously into his favour.” “The Holy Spirit has exhorted the faithful to continue clapping their hands for joy, until the advent of the promised Redeemer.” (Calvin, on the Psalms) Come unfaithful sons of the Reformation (preachers) have removed the ancient landmarks, so that their flocks wander about, doubtful of what is their...

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Prof. Gritters is professor of Practical Theology in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. The beginning of faith is humility…  (Calvin, on Isaiah) The whole humility of man consists in the knowledge of himself.  (Calvin, on the Psalms) The grimmest evil in this sad world is the evil of pride. In the maelstrom of that root sin that thrashes families and marriages, divides churches, and separates very friends, God’s power is most evident when He graces His people with humility. If you believe that, you have reason to give serious consideration to what the Reformer said, “The beginning of faith is humility,”...

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Rev. Gritters is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Hudsonville, Michigan. This Meditation is the text of the pre-synodical sermon preached by Rev. Gritters in First PRC on June 11, 2001. Esteemed brethren of synod and beloved church of Jesus Christ, if the PRC are anything, they are churches that by the grace of God preach the grace of God—sovereign, irresistible, particular grace, in Jesus, God’s Messiah. If the PRC desire to be known by something, they desire to be known as churches willing to deny themselves and take up their cross for the sake of the defense of...

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Rev. Gritters is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Hudsonville, Michigan. Heartache   In my pastorate, the most heart-breaking experience I have is to witness parents lose children to rebellion. I have seen parents lose children in death. Oh, how we hurt, then. But little compares to the grief of parents whose children reject them and the Lord. They probably leave the house at age 18, anxious to get away from the parents who gave them life. Perhaps they marry an unbeliever. They spurn the warnings of the elders and leave the church, violating God’s covenant, despising their baptism....

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Rev. Gritters is pastor of the Protestant Reformed Church of Hudsonville, Michigan. recently I received a telephone call and a letter taking issue with the contents of one of my articles under the title “Shall We Dance, Rock, and Play: Or, How Shall We Judge Contemporary Worship?” I am thankful that the Standard Bearer is read and that the articles provoke discussion and comment. And I am thankful to both who responded for their stimulating comments. The telephone call was from one of the pastors of Mars Hill Church, who indicated that my representation of his church was not accurate....

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On Monday, June 19 (yesterday, as I write), the 2006 Synod of the Protestant Reformed Churches in America, meeting in Faith PRC, Jenison, MI, adjourned. Under the capable leadership of the president, Rev. Ronald VanOverloop (Byron Center, MI), synod concluded its important work in five days. The vice-president was Rev. S. Key (Hull, Iowa); first clerk, Rev. D. Kleyn (Holland, MI); second clerk, Rev. R. Smit (Lacombe, BC). Many rejoicings Highlight of the week was the two seminary graduates’ sustaining of a rigorous, public examination. Mr. Andrew Lanning and Mr. Clayton Spronk are now Candidate Lanning andCandidate Spronk, eligible for call on July...

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By now, all the delegates of the upcoming Synod of the Protestant Reformed Churches have received and begun to study the agenda for the meetings. Each officebearer of every consistory has also received a copy of this year’s relatively slim agenda. Because the agenda is not private, also the membership of the PRC and any interested observers may know what issues the churches will be deliberating at this gathering. Synod is the PRC’s broadest (denomination-wide) assembly. Classis meetings are not as broad; they are regional assemblies, with two delegates from each consistory in the classis. For synod, each classis delegates ten men...

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Previous article in this series: May 1, 2006, p. 340. In the two previous editorials I urged that the mission work of the Protestant Reformed Churches is worthy of heartiest support. First, it is worthy of support because of what it is—the diligent labor of churches and men eager to be faithful to the calling of Jesus Christ. Men of God and their families give their lives for the highest cause. In the hope that God’s people will be called and God’s name lifted up they go out. Second, it is worthy of support because of what it is not—an attempt to...

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