All Articles For Engelsma, David

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Editor’s Notes. 1. Rev. Engelsma called my attention to a typographical error in his article in the Jan. 1 issue, p. 155, first column, last paragraph. The sentence concerned should read: “His reference was not, primarily, to the heathen, but to the multitudes of fainting, scattered Israelites, the Old Testament people of God, under the care of the priests and scribes.” 2. These articles of Rev. Engelsma are a transcript of a lecture on this subject. The reader will notice there is duplication between this department and Prof. Decker’s. The latter had begun his series, however, before Rev.

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Of the Canons of Dordt, it is true, as of the prophet inZechariah 13:6, that its wounds are “those with which I was wounded in the house of my friends.” In those houses of God where there is such effusive profession of love and esteem for the Canons that all rulers and teachers in the house are made to swear an oath in the Name of the Lord, that they “heartily believe and are persuaded that all the articles and points of doctrine, contained in the Confession and Catechism of the Reformed C

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Prof. Engelsma is professor emeritus of Dogmatics and Old Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. Introduction The doctrine of the covenant of grace is thrust to the foreground in Reformed and Presbyterian churches today by the heresy of the federal vision. The name itself of the false teaching indicates this, for “federal” means ‘covenant.’ In the providence of God, who uses heresy to clarify and establish the truth of the gospel, the federal [covenant] vision brings to a head the controversy over the covenant in Reformed churches from the sixteenth-century Reformation of the church to the present day. Two distinct...

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Prof. Engelsma is professor emeritus of Dogmatics and Old Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. Previous article in this series: August 2009, p. 448. Introduction The truth of the millennium is corrupted by two, distinct errors concerning the thousand years of Revelation 20. Not only do these two doctrines err in their explanation of the millennium, but they also grossly exaggerate its importance. The millennium, a relatively minor teaching found in only one chapter of the Bible (and that, in the highly figurative and symbolical book of Revelation), comes to dominate all of eschatology and even to occupy an unduly...

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“For this cause God gave them up unto vile affections: for even their women did change the natural use into that which is against nature: “And likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust one toward another; men with men working that which is unseemly, and receiving in themselves that recompense of their error which was meet.  “And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a reprobate mind, to do those things which are not convenient.”

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Previous article in this series: September 1, 2011, p. 464. In light of these basic elements of postmillennial eschatology, Reformed amillennialism renders its critique of postmillennialism. The critique applies to both the Puritan and the Christian Reconstruction forms of postmillennialism. This critique does not merely fault postmillennialism for a few, minor mistakes. Rather, it judges postmillennialism to be grievous error concerning the important biblical doctrine of the last things. The practical consequences of the error both for the church and for the Christian are injurious. The right Reformed critique of postmillennialism will certainly not recognize postmillennialism as a legitimate eschatological...

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* The text of the address given at the annual meeting of the Reformed Free Publishing Association (RFPA) on September 22, 2011 at Faith Protestant Reformed Church, Jenison, MI. Introduction In the last few days of September and the first three days of October, 1951, that is, sixty years ago to the month and almost to the day, the synod of the Protestant Reformed Churches (PRC) took the most important decisions in their history to that date, indeed, to the present day. By votes consistently of nine to seven—the slimmest majority possible, one vote—the synod adopted a document called “The...

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