All Articles For Engelsma, David

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Previous article in this series: May 15, 2017, p. 372. “For I would not, brethren, that ye should be ignorant of this mystery, lest ye should be wise in your own conceits; that blindness in part is happened to Israel, until the fulness of the Gentiles be come in. “And so all Israel shall be saved: as it is written, There shall come out of Sion the Deliverer, and shall turn away ungodliness from Jacob: “For this is my covenant unto them, when I shall take away their sins.” Romans 11:25-27 Introduction Scarcely less important to dispensational premillennialism than Revelation...

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Previous article in this series: March 1, 2017, p. 253. Introduction The Reformed response to the premillennial appeal to the vision of the seventy weeks in Daniel 9 on behalf of a future earthly millennium of carnal power and glory for national Israel is, first, to insist on the symbolical meaning of the number seventy. Seventy is the number of the fulfillment of the covenant of God with His people in the Messiah, who is Jesus. The seventy weeks of Daniel 9 represent the time from the release of the Jews from the Babylonian captivity to the coming of the...

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Previous article in this series: February 1, 2017, p. 203. Introduction As I pointed out in the preceding article in this series, the vision of the seventy weeks in Daniel 9:24-27 is of the greatest importance to dispensational premillennialism. The Daniel passage is as important to premillennialism as Revelation 20. Wholly and exclusively a prophecy about the nation of Israel, not at all about the church, the passage is explained by premillennialism as forecasting the return of the captive Jews to Jerusalem and their rebuilding the city of Jerusalem. Explaining the weeks as weeks of years, premillennialism understands the sixty-nine...

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Previous article in this series: December 15, 2016, p. 129. Introduction Of at least equal importance for the premillennial understanding of the last things with Revelation 20 is the prophecy of the seventy weeks of Daniel 9. Taking the seventy weeks as seventy weeks of years, that is, a definite period of 490 years, premillennialism separates the seventieth week from the preceding sixty-nine weeks. The first sixty-nine weeks were the time between the command to rebuild Jerusalem and the coming of the Messiah, who is Jesus. The seventieth week, however, does not immediately follow the sixty-nine, according to premillennialism. The...

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The Reformed Baptism Form: A Commentary, Bastiaan Wielenga. Ed. David J. Engelsma. Jenison, MI: RFPA, 2016. Hardcover. 425 pp., $39.95. [Reviewed by David J. Engelsma.] This is the title of a book that is hot off the presses of the Reformed Free Publishing Association (RFPA). The book is an unusual publication of the RFPA. It is not authored by a Protestant Reformed man or woman. Nor is it an original piece of writing. Rather, it is the translation into English for the first time of a commentary on the Reformed Baptism Form. The commentary was originally written in the Dutch...

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Previous article in this series: September 1, 2016, p. 469. Introduction Of equal importance to dispensational premillennialism with Revelation 20, if not more importance, is Daniel 9. Daniel 9:24-27 is the prophet’s “vision” of seventy weeks. To the prophet in Babylon with the nation of Judah, in answer to his prayer confessing the sins of the people and making supplication that Jehovah God would remember and fulfill His promise through Jeremiah that God “would accomplish seventy years in the desolations of Jerusalem” (vv. 2, 20), was given confirmation that God would fulfill His promise to deliver His covenant people. The...

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When I read Prof. Engelsma’s article [“Conditionality, Not Responsibility” in the September 15, 2016 Standard Bearer, p. 487], it reminds me of his book Covenant and Election in the Reformed Tradition [RFPA, 2011]. If I understand correctly, the Reformed Baptism Form is set up with only elect children in mind. Your book deals with the question what it means to be “sanctified in Christ.” According to a footnote on page 121, VanVelzen was amazed, indignant, and horrified with a weak interpretation of being sanctified in Christ, and insisted that, as certainly as our children have been washed with water, they...

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In a recent blog post,1 the Rev. Wes Bredenhof, a Canadian Reformed minister, contends that the Protestant Reformed objection to the covenant doctrine of the Canadian Reformed Churches is, in fact, a denial of personal responsibility. By their criticism of the Canadian Reformed—and “liberated”—doctrine of the covenant, the Protestant Reformed Churches (PRC) are guilty of denying human responsibility, particularly with regard to salvation in the covenant of grace. The PRC are strong on divine sovereignty, if not obsessed with it, but derelict on human responsibility. The title of Bredenhof ’s piece is “Personal Responsibility.” His charge is that the PRC...

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Previous article in this series: May 1, 2016, p. 352. Introduction The previous article in this series pointed out two errors of the premillennial understanding of Revelation which, although serious, are not the fundamental error of the explanation of Revelation 20 by that doctrine of the last things. One serious error is the supposition that Revelation 20 teaches events that follow the events recorded in Revelation 19 in time and history. According to this mistaken notion, the binding of Satan and the millennium occur after the destruction of Antichrist and his infernal army as recorded in Revelation 19. This understanding...

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2016, p. 184. Introduction Regardless that dispensational premillennialism insists that its expectation of a millennium of earthly power, riches, peace, and glory for Israel does not rest exclusively, or even mainly, on Revelation 20, Revelation 20 is fundamental to this eschatology. If the premillennial understanding of Revelation 20 is in error, the whole of this doctrine of the last things is shown to be false. In the immediately preceding articles in this series, I have given the premillennial explanation of Revelation 20:1-10, with some criticism of this explanation. In this article and the...

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