All Articles For Doezema, Don

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Previous article in this series: May 1, 2013, p. 355. We left Adam and Eve, last time, clothed in the fig leaves they had sewed together to cover their nakedness—their nakedness, that is, before God. The deepest cause of their fear and of their shame (cf. Gen. 3:11) came from their awareness of their guilt and of the corruption of their natures. Yes, the corruption of their natures. They could feel it. They did not have to be told that by their disobedience and fall they had rendered themselves unfit for fellowship with the holy God. They did not have...

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Previous article in this series: April 1, 2013, p. 302. On the pages of the Old Testament Scriptures we find evidence aplenty that Christ’s shad­ow figured prominently in the history of the old dispensation (cf., for example, I Cor. 10:1-4). Implied, surely, is that the types would have failed in their purpose had the believer not, by them, been in fact led to Christ.

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2013, p. 182. The Adult Bible Study Society in Southwest Church is studying the book of Genesis. A few weeks ago we came to chapter 4, Cain and Abel. An interesting question was raised by one of the members. He prefaced the question by giving a brief statement of the distinction between Abel’s of­fering of a bloody sacrifice, unto which the Lord had “respect” (v. 4), and Cain’s offering of a bloodless sacri­fice, unto which the Lord had not “respect” (v. 5). “We understand this well,” he said. (That is, we who live...

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Previous article in this series: January 1, 2013, p. 153.   Isaiah was a prophet in Jerusalem during the reigns of no fewer than four kings of Judah: Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah (Is. 1:1). Uzziah and Jotham were good kings. Judah therefore enjoyed an extended period of prosperity. The great increase in worldly wealth and luxury was accompanied by a de­cline in spirituality among the people generally. When Jotham’s son Ahaz began to practice idolatry, first after the manner of “the kings of Israel” (II Chron. 28:2), and then “after the abominations of the heathen” (II Chron. 28:3), the...

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Previous article in this series: December 15, 2012, p. 136. Judah’s history demonstrates beyond a shadow of doubt that she hankered after idols no less than her sister Israel. Their histories nevertheless dif­fered, because the Lord graciously raised up in Judah a number of good kings, kings who brought reformation. Reformations, however, proved always to be short-lived. Think of good king Hezekiah. Hezekiah’s wicked fa­ther, Ahaz, had “cut in pieces the vessels of the house of God, and shut up the doors of the house of the Lord, and he made altars in every corner of Jerusalem. And in every...

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Previous article in this series: February 1, 2012, p. 208.   Perhaps you will recall that a year ago we started in this rubric what we hope to be a series of ar­ticles on the very beginning of New Testament Bible history. We began, however, with a quick review of the end of Old Testament history—not for its own sake but, as we said at that time, “for the perspective that the Old gives to the New. For it is out of the scat­tering of the people of Israel and the ruins of the house of David that there comes...

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With a Classis report as long as that one, we’re going to have to be rather selective in our choice of news items for this issue, and save the rest for next time.  Rev. Heys writes that he plans his Farewell Sermon for April 19, and that he’s “booked up with meetings” to the very end of his stay. He also mentioned that the days were getting warmer—meaning temperatures higher than 80 degrees. That was on March 25, the day prior to one in which the schools in Grand Rapids had to be called off as the result of a...

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