All Articles For Doezema, Don

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For several reasons I’m glad for the letter from Dr. Kennedy printed above. I appreciate, first of all, the “query” itself, as it demonstrates interest in and careful attention to subject matter that has come to be dear to my heart. But, in addition, it gives me opportunity to address a related question. After the printing of the article to which Dr. Kennedy refers, I was asked twice by a couple of discerning readers if what I had meant to say in that article was that Simeon may well have been predicting the death of Jesus, bot was not foreseeing...

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Previous article in this series: April 15, 2017, p. 326. “But when Christ could be pointed out with the finger,” as we quoted last time from John Calvin, “the Kingdom of God was opened.” We looked briefly at the extent to which that was true of old Simeon. Some thirty years later, John the Baptist was privileged to do so even more literally. I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness, Make straight the way of the Lord, as said the prophet Esaias…. He it is, who coming after me is preferred before me, whose shoe’s latchet I...

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2017, p. 177. The saints of old were able to ‘see’ the coming of Christ. Jesus Himself said as much when He testified to the Jews that “Abraham rejoiced to see my day, and he saw it and was glad” (John 8:56). Nevertheless, in a very real sense they did not see. As Jesus said to His disciples, “For I tell you, that many prophets and kings have desired to see those things which ye see, and have not seen them; and to hear those things which ye hear, and have not heard...

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Previous article in this series: February 15, 2016, p. 227. (Note: Because it has been almost a year since the last article in this series appeared in print, a quick reminder of where we were at might be helpful. We were considering the types and shadows of the old dispensation. We noted that David, in Psalm 51:16, though reflecting first of all on the place of sacrifices in his own day, was also saying something about their end in the dispensation to come. A remarkable prophecy, we said, especially in light of how difficult it was for the saints of...

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Previous article in this series: February 1, 2016, p. 203. We ended our last article with the convening of the Council of Jerusalem, which had been called at the request of the church in Antioch, specifically to decide the place of the Levitical rites in the calling of the Gentiles. The question had not originated in that church but had, rather, been foisted upon it by Judaizers from Jerusalem, who insisted that “except ye be circumcised after the manner of Moses, ye cannot be saved” (Acts 15:1). To the calling church for the work of ‘foreign missions,’ that was a...

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Previous article in this series: January 15, 2016, p. 179. David, we said, was foreseeing in Psalm 40 and Psalm 51 the Gospel age, when not even the lowest place would be left for any of the rites that were strictly required under the Law. Not only, therefore, was he embracing the Antitype, but he was also dismissing the types. All of them. And that, as we pointed out, was no little thing. Whether we view it from the perspective of what went before, or of what came after, we see David standing as it were on a mountaintop in...

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Previous article in this series: December 15, 2015, p. 132. We were considering, you will remember, the penitential prayer of David recorded in Psalm 51, focusing in particular on verse 16. “Thou desirest not sacrifice,” David prayed. And: “Thou delightest not in burnt offering.” Having been brought to his knees by the prophet Nathan’s withering pronouncement “Thou art the man,” David understood, more profoundly than ever before, that no one can come to God with something in his hand. An expression of “absolute destitution of merit” is what Calvin sees in those words of David. Remarkable insights, we said. But...

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Previous article in this series: December 1, 2015, p. 106. “Why tarriest thou,” said Ananias to a Jew newly converted to Christianity, “arise, and be baptized, and wash away thy sins” (Acts 22:16). That was Saul of Tarsus. Having been taught “at the feet of Gamaliel” (Acts 22:3), he was well versed in the Pharisaistic system of legal righteousness. And he had rejected Christianity. With a vengeance. Before being able fully to comprehend a righteousness that is by faith, therefore, Saul, in a very real sense, had to unlearn the whole of his dogmatics. It was to this man that...

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Previous article in this series: October 15, 2015, p. 37. “For thou desirest not sacrifice; else would I give it: thou delightest not in burnt offering.” That’s from Psalm 51. Stunning words, really, when we consider them in light of who wrote them. And when. They were written by David, the man “after God’s heart,” who knew God’s law and loved it. He was therefore well acquainted with the book of Leviticus, which, if nothing else, made it crystal clear that sacrifices and offerings were not optional. Repeatedly we read concerning the ceremonial rites, “as the Lord commanded Moses.” And...

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Previous article in this series: September 15, 2015, p. 493. Who, in his right mind or even not quite so, would ever try to teach something of the beauty of a symphony by Beethoven, or a piano concerto of Mozart… to a donkey? Have you taken a moment to ponder that? Then think of this, from John Calvin: What must be “carefully attended to,” he writes in his commentary on I Corinthians 1:20, is that “man with all his shrewdness is as stupid about understanding by himself the mysteries of God as an ass is incapable of understanding musical harmony.”...

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