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All Articles For Decker, Robert D

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Leading in Prayer: A Workbook for Worship, by Hughes Oliphant Old. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1995. Pp. xi-370. $19.99. (paper). [Reviewed by Prof. Robert D. Decker.] This is a very good book on a much needed subject. While the emphasis of the book is on the public prayers a minister is called to offer in the worship service, the author has a good deal to say about worship in general. Prayer is an art, i.e., it is a gift from God. All God’s servants in the ministry must have this gift to one degree or another...

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Several months ago we began a study of the book,The Planting And Development Of Missionary Churches, by Dr. John L. Nevius. Dissatisfied with the mission methods of his day (late 1800s) Nevius proposed a new method which has come to be known as the “Nevius method or plan.” The old plan depended largely on paid native preachers and evangelists and sought to foster and stimulate the growth and development of the native mission by pouring money into the work.

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SOLVING MARRIAGE PROBLEMS, by Jay E. Adams; Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing Co., 1983; 122 pp., (paper) $4.50. (Reviewed by Prof. R.D. Decker) Still another book from the pen of Jay Adams, Director of Advanced Studies at Westminster Theological Seminary in California! This book is intended for pastors and other Christian counselors, but may be profitably read by any Christian. One does not always agree with Adams’ views, especially his view of divorce and the remarriage of divorced persons. Nonetheless, Adams’ approach is Biblical and he insists that marriage problems are caused by sin and can be cured only by grace...

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Los Angeles – With all the news about the survival of Christianity in Communist China, it is important to realize that there are two kinds of churches in China today, not just one, a noted China watcher said here.  The Rev. Silas Hong, executive director of United Evangelism to the Chinese, based here, warned those trying to make contact with Christians in China that there is an official, government- sanctioned church in China which may not represent the Gospel for the purest of motives. 

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Robert D. Decker is professor of New Testament and Practical Theology in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. Lady in the Pulpit The teaching of Holy Scripture on the place of women in the church is so clear that even a child can understand it. The Bible says, “Let the woman learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence. For Adam was first formed, then Eve. And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression. Notwithstanding she shall be...

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Perhaps, youthful friend, you recall that in my contributions to this column I am attempting to answer certain questions presented to me by the young people in my congregation. It so happens in the providence of God that I have just finished a sermon for the coming Lord’s Day on the Fifth Commandment which is also, as you can gather from the title of this article, the subject of the question we wish to answer. The question reads: “How far does obedience to parents go?

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Prof. Decker is professor of Practical Theology in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. “The Reformed Church in the United States should begin now to forge links of fellowship and cooperation that will lead to eventual union with other Reformed churches. Our period of geographic and cultural isolation is at an end. It is time for the RCUS to become more definitely a part of the continuing Reformation.” With these words The Reverend Peter B. Grossman, editor of his denomination’s magazine, Reformed Herald, began a recent editorial. The RCUS is the conservative remnant of the old “German” Reformed Church. In 1934 one...

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September 18, 1991 Dear Brothers and sisters in the Lord: What a difference having a few more students makes! We have seven in all: dive from our PR churches and two from the Evangelical Presbyterian Churches in Australia. The parking lot is nearly full, as are also the classrooms. Because the professors also use their classrooms as offices, there is little room to spare in some classes. With classes of five to seven students there is often lively discussion of pertinent theological issues. Professors are stimulated and sometimes challenged. Students encourage one another and are motivated to further study by...

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