All Articles For Cammenga, Ronald

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I teach Hebrew in the Protestant Reformed Theological Seminary (PRTS). Hebrew is a language like no other language. It is a beautiful language. It is a richly expressive language. It is a picturesque language. For good reason it was the language in which God inspired the Old Testament Scriptures. Students at PRTS are required to take five semesters of Hebrew. Besides Hebrew, all students at PRTS must also study Greek, the language of the New Testament. It was the language in which the gospel accounts were written, which describe the birth, life, suffering and death of our Savior, the Lord...

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Kemp: The Story of John R. and Mabel Kempers, Founders of the Reformed Church in America Mission in Chiapas, Mexico, by Pablo A. Deiros. The Historical Series of the Reformed Church in America, No. 86. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans. Pp. xxxvi + 522. $38.00 (paperback). ISBN-13: 978-0802873545. [Reviewed by Ronald L. Cammenga.]   Of the many worthwhile books that have been published in The Historical Series of the Reformed Church in America, this book, which is number 86 in the series, is a very worthwhile addition. If I am not mistaken, it is the largest book in the...

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The Belgic Confession: A Commentary, Volume 1, by David J. Engelsma. Jenison, MI: Reformed Free Publishing Association, 2018. Pp. xviii + 348. $31.95 (hardcover). ISBN-13: 978-1944555-33-7. [Reviewed by Ronald L. Cammenga.] The Belgic Confession: A Commentary, Volume 2, by David J. Engelsma. Jenison, MI: Reformed Free Publishing Association, 2019. Pp. xvi + 382. $34.95 (hardcover). ISBN-13: 978-1944555-35-1. [Reviewed by Ronald L. Cammenga.]   This two-volume commentary on the Belgic or Netherlands Confession of Faith is a welcome addition to the expositions of Reformed confessional literature published by the Reformed Free Publishing Association. Although the Belgic Confession is the earliest of...

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Recognizing the Legacy of George M. Ophoff, by Douglas J. Kuiper. ThM thesis, Calvin Theological Seminary, 2019. Pp. v + 135. $20.00 (hardcover). [Reviewed by Ronald L. Cammenga.]   Synod 2017 of the Protestant Reformed Churches in America appointed the Reverend Douglas J. Kuiper, then minister of the First Protestant Reformed Church of Edgerton, Minnesota, to the chair of Church History and New Testament Studies. After accepting the appointment, Prof. Kuiper immediately set himself to the task of securing his advanced degree, the master of theology degree. After completing his course work, Prof. Kuiper wrote his thesis, which he entitled...

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Previous article in this series: April 15, 2018, p. 323. In the last several articles in this series we have been examining the perfections of Scripture. Just as God possesses certain perfections, so also does His Word. The perfection of God’s being demands the perfection of His works, and one of His greatest works is the revelation of Himself in His Word. Who and what God is necessarily impacts the nature of His Word. It cannot be otherwise. If God is weak and fallible, so also His Word will be weak and fallible. But if God is perfect and absolutely...

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Previous article in this series: March 15, 2018, p. 279. The Epicureans We therefore condemn the Epicureans who deny the providence of God, and all those who blasphemously say that God is busy with the heavens and neither sees nor cares about us and our affairs. David, the royal prophet, also condemned this when he said: “O Lord, how long shall the wicked exult? They say, ‘The Lord does not see; the God of Jacob does not perceive.’ Understand, O dullest of the people! Fools, when will you be wise? He who planted the ear, does he not hear? He...

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Previous article in this series: March 1, 2018, p. 252. Additional proof of Scripture’s sufficiency We ended our last article by demonstrating Scripture’s sufficiency from the two classic passages on the infallible inspiration of Scripture, II Timothy 3:16-17 and II Peter 1:19-21. Besides the support for the sufficiency of Scripture that is found in these two classic passages, there are other texts that underscore this truth concerning the Bible. One of those texts is Deuteronomy 4:2, “Ye shall not add unto the word which I command you, neither shall ye diminish ought from it, that ye may keep the commandments...

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Previous article in this series: December 15, 2017, p. 130. Introduction With chapter 6 of the Second Helvetic Confession, Heinrich Bullinger directs our attention to the providence of God. Along with the other Reformers, Bullinger subscribes to a robust doctrine of divine providence. God’s providence includes all things; no one and nothing is outside of the scope of God’s providence. Everything that takes place in time and in history is directed by the providence of God. Interestingly enough, Bullinger treats the truth of providence before the truth of creation and the fall of man into sin. That is not the...

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Previous article in this series: December 1, 2017, p. 99. God’s holiness and Scripture’s perfection Just as God has attributes, so does also the Word of God. Because Scripture is the Word of God, it partakes of the attributes of God whose Word it is. This has historically been the position of the church and has been an important part of its defense of the Bible’s infallible inspiration. Over against those who deny Scripture’s divine inspiration, the church has historically appealed to the perfection of God Himself. Since God is perfect and holy, so also is His Word. Today prominent...

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I enjoyed reading Prof. Ronald Cammenga’s article, “‘What Saith the Scripture:’ The Bible’s Perspicuity” in the December 1, 2017 issue of the Standard Bearer. However, after reading it, it did raise a question for me. If Wycliffe, Tyndale, and others worked so hard and even risked their lives to give the English people an updated, understandable English Bible, why do all the writers in the Standard Bearer quote Scripture from a four-hundred-year-old (KJV) version of the Bible when we have several updated versions available? It reminds me of the Amish, who continually use live horsepower for work and travel when...

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