All Articles For Cammenga, Ronald

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Previous article in this series: November 15, 2015, p. 84. Councils And in the same order also we place the decrees and canons of councils. Wherefore we do not permit ourselves, in controversies about religion or matters of faith, to urge our case with only the opinions of the fathers or decrees of council; much less by received customs, or by the large number of those who share the same opinion, or by the prescription of a long time. Who is the judge? Therefore, we do not admit any other judge than God himself, who proclaims by the Holy Scriptures...

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Previous article in this series: August 2015, p. 438.   The True Interpretation of Scripture   The apostle Peter has said that the Holy Scriptures are not of private interpretation (II Pet. 1:20), and thus we do not allow all possible interpretations. Nor consequently do we acknowledge as the true or genuine interpretation of the Scriptures what is called the conception of the Roman [Catholic] Church, that is, what the defenders of the Roman [Catholic] Church plainly maintain should be thrust upon all for acceptance. But we hold that interpretation of the Scripture to be orthodox and genuine which is...

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This is the third installment of the address that was given on the occasion of the graduation of Candidate Mr. Ryan Barnhill from the Protestant Reformed Theological Seminary on June 11, 2015. Previous installment was printed in the September 15, 2015 issue, p. 490. The Minister’s Calling with Regard to His Wife We are at present considering the calling that the minister has toward the wife that God has graciously given him. We have seen that the expression in I Timothy 3:2 that the minister is to be “the husband of one wife” does not only underscore one of the...

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This is the second installment of the address that was given on the occasion of the graduation of Candidate Mr. Ryan Barnhill from the Protestant Reformed Theological Seminary on June 11, 2015. Marriage of the Clergy The Reformers encouraged the clergy to marry and repudiated Rome’s unbiblical requirement of clerical celibacy. Both Luther and Calvin repeatedly blasted Rome and her pope for making this commandment of men a command of God. Calvin did so in a sermon preached on Monday, October 2, 1559 in Geneva. The sermon text was Genesis 2:22-24. The title of the sermon was, “The Inviolable Union...

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Prof. Cammenga is professor of Dogmatics and Old Testament in the Protestant Reformed Seminary. This is the first installment of the address that was given on the occasion of the graduation of Candidate Mr. Ryan Barnhill from the Protestant Reformed Theological Seminary on June 11, 2015. Introduction Dear graduate, colleagues of the faculty, members of the Theological School Committee, fathers of synod, family and friends of the graduate, and brothers and sisters in Jesus Christ, we rejoice together tonight in the goodness of God. We rejoice in the goodness of God in giving to the Protestant Reformed Churches another man...

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Previous article in this series: May 1, 2015, p. 346. (Second Helvetic Confession, Chapter 1, B) Fundamental to everything that the Reformed Christian believes and confesses is the truth of sacred Scripture: “…in this Holy Scripture, the universal Church of Christ has the most complete exposition of all that pertains to a saving faith, and also to the framing of a life acceptable to God…” (SHC, 1.1). What we believe and confess is derived from Scripture, is taught in Scripture, and can be defended on the basis of Scripture. It is what we believe about Scripture more than anything else...

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Previous article in this series: February 15, 2015, p. 223. Introduction Christians are Bible-believing, Bible-reading, Bible-honoring, and Bible-loving folk. In the past, Christians were often referred to as “the people of the Book.” That is indeed what they are—people of the Book. They are people of the Book because of the place that the Bible has in their lives. They are people of the Book because of the regard that they have for the Bible and the use that they make of the Bible. And they are people of the Book because this is what distinguishes them from those who...

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Previous article in this series: March 1, 2015, p. 254. With this article we begin our consideration of the thirty chapters of the Second Helvetic Confession. Considering the length of these chapters, our plan is to write two Standard Bearer articles on each chapter. We will quote the individual sections of each chapter; following each section we will give a brief exposition. We intend to use the titles of the chapters of the Confession as the titles for our articles. Although the chapters of the Second Helvetic Confession are quite lengthy, quoting them is necessary if the purpose of familiarity with the...

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Previous article in this series: January 1, 2015, p. 158. Background The Second Helvetic Confession was written in 1562 by Heinrich Bullinger (1504-1575), whose life we considered in our previous article. It was intended by Bullinger to be buried with him as a testimony to the faith for which he had lived and which he had defended to his dying day. But despite his intentions, before he died Bullinger’s confession came to light and was widely disseminated. This was due to a request from the pious Elector of the Palatinate, Frederick III, that Bullinger prepare a clear and complete exposition...

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Previous article in this series: October 1, 2014, p. 10. Introduction If the Bible is not an altogether unique book, both as far as its contents and its authority are concerned, then the Christian Scriptures are reduced to what its critics, whether outside of Christianity or apostates from Christianity, allege: a merely human book, intended to solve merely human problems, flawed by human foibles, and suffering from the delusion that it is something more. If Christianity is to make good on any claim that it represents something greater than the other world religions, that it is not just another philosophy...

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