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(Connection: In the last installment we saw the conflict become more intense. In some parts of the country actual separation began to take place, and even the formation of so-called “nood-gemeenten” (emergency congregations). Meanwhile, Simon Episcopius, on advice of the Remonstrants, was called to the Academy of Leiden. Again pleas were made to the States-General to authorize a National Synod; but this was prevented through the influence of. the Remonstrants. The latter continued to make open and shameful propaganda, to the grief and injury of the churches.) 

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(In the previous installment we learned about another conference, urged by WiIlem Lodewijk, Count of Nassau and Governor of Friesland, between three representatives of the Remonstrants, led by Johannes Uitenbogaard, and three representatives of the Reformed, led by Festus Hommius. The Remonstrants sought toleration for their views—no strings attached. The Reformed sought a limited toleration pending the convening of a National Synod. The conference was held at Delft, but it was fruitless.

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THE REFORMERS AND THEIR STEPCHILDREN,by Leonard Verduin; Baker Book House, 1980; 292 pp., $7.95 (paper). (Reviewed by Prof. H. Hanko.)  I read this book by Verduin when it first came out about sixteen or seventeen years ago. But now that it has been republished, it has been sent to the Standard Bearer for review and I read it once again. My opinion of the book remains pretty much unchanged. 

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(Connection: In the previous section we saw that the Remonstrant party continued its underhanded maneuverings to gain “toleration” for itself. However, in several cities the Contra-Remonstrants had the support of the civil authorities in continuing to insist that the differences in the churches had to be resolved by synodical decision. Among these were Amsterdam, Dordrecht, Enkhuizen, Edam, and Purmerend.) 

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FREEDOM AND GRACE: ESSAYS by J.R. Lucas; Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1976; 138 pp., $7.95.  The author of the essays in this book is a fellow of Merton College, Oxford. The book was first published in Great Britain, but Eerdmans has received publishing rights in this country. The author is an excellent writer, somewhat on the order of C.S. Lewis; and the book makes for interesting reading. 

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Publication News. Behold, He Cometh! is now newly available from the RFPA, after a brief period of being out of print. It is also available at a new price: $12.95, due to our increased costs. We may also report thatThe Voice Of Our Fathers (An Exposition of the Canons of Dordrecht) has gone to press and should become available sometime in early fall. One more note—this one a note of warning. Many of our earlier publications, when they are reprinted, will go up in price. If you want to buy at lower prices, buy now. Write to: Reformed Free Publishing Association,...

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