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THE PATTERN OF TREATMENT SUGGESTED IN THE TEXT  The writer continues here in the stylish phrases and sentences “and what shall I yet say? For the time would fail me to declare in detail concerning Gideon, Barak, Samson and Jephtha!” It is presupposed that the readers are familiar with their Old Testament Scriptures; yea, that a mere mention of these heroes of faith during the time of the Judges, when every one did what was right in his own eyes, would bring to mind the mighty and gallant deeds of faith and warfare of these deliverers of Israel.

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Sometimes we are told that we are led as sheep to the slaughter. This was true during the years of the early church and during the time of the Reformation, but not at present. I know that we experience a little opposition sometimes; but we all have nice houses to live in, and every family has one or more cars, etc., etc. Is the roaring lion taking a vacation? Of course not! Neither is it because as churches we pray for all that are in authority, that we may lead a quiet and peaceful life: for that is never done.

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At the beginning of the Conference they again debated concerning the order of the Articles which would be treated. Arminius seemed to think that it was advantageous for his cause to begin with predestination. But, seeing that the article concerning justification seemed to be more necessary, Gomarus believed that they should begin with this; and this was also the pleasure of the States. Concerning this point of doctrine there was the same dispute as that which had taken place earlier before the High Council, namely; whether faith itself, in respect of the fact that it is a deed, is.

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(Connection: In the preceding section we saw Gomarus, accompanied by several of his fellow ministers, debating against Arminius, accompanied by several of his fellows. The subject was the various points of doctrine about which they disagreed. The conference was held in the presence of the States. At the conclusion of the conference, the States promised to convene a Provincial Synod; but to this promise conditions were attached with which the Reformed ministers could not comply. They also ordered both parties to submit their views in writing.

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INTRODUCTION TO PURITAN THEOLOGY, A READER; Edited by Edward Hindson, Baker Book House, 1976; 282 pp., $8.95.  Especially for the majority of the readers of theStandard Bearer, most of whom have little acquaintance with the Puritans, this is an extremely worthwhile book. It is intended to be an introduction to Puritan writings and Puritan thought. J.I. Packer, who writes the foreword, explains the importance of re-studying Puritan thought in our days:

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(Connection: In the previous installment we learned: 1) That the Remonstrants were pushing for the appointment of Vorstius as the replacement for Arminius at Leiden. 2) That the Remonstrants gained a certain legal standing for their Five Points, so that candidates for the ministry could not be questioned about these. 3) That in this process the document called the Remonstrance finally came into the possession of the Reformed party. 4) That all of this led to the Conference at the Hague in 1611.

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Connection: In the preceding section we saw: 1) That Conrad Vorstius, the Socinian nominee to replace Arminius at Leiden, returned to the Netherlands. 2) That King James I, of Great Britain, strongly warned against Vorstius. 3) That the Curators of the Academy were ordered not to proceed with the call of Vorstius. 4) That the Hague Conference resulted in no solution to the problems in the churches.) 

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